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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Friday - February 24, 2012

From: Colorado Springs, CO
Region: Rocky Mountain
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Current forecast for wildflowers from Colorado Springs
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What is your current forecast for wildflowers this spring?

ANSWER:

So, where exactly are you planning to look? Forecasts on this sort of thing can change even from county to county, especially in Colorado, which involves changes in elevation that can also affect what grows and blooms in a specific area. You might start with this website Colorado Wildflowers, which has links leading you to more information on the flowers and locations. Since your blooming seasons are different from the ones in Texas, you might try this website Crested Butte Wildflower Festival for dates when common Colorado wildflowers would be expected to be blooming.

If you are talking about bluebonnets and other Texas wildflowers, planning a trip here to see them, the forecast is pretty good. After a very weak season last year due to drought, we have had rains at the right time this year and expect a nice showing. As usual, the Spring wildflowers tend to peak in late March to early April, but there are wildflowers blooming almost year round somewhere in Texas, and always at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. Read this article on Wildflower Days. Also, Texas Wildflowers.

 

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