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Friday - February 10, 2012

From: Leander, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Soils
Title: What is the application rate for dried molasses in Leander, TX??
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I bought dry molasses to add to my soil but the bag doesn't say anything about how much to add. Should I just sprinkle it around and it doesn't matter if it is more or less? I have 2.25 acres so I bought a 50lb bag to start.

ANSWER:


Dry or dried molasses is a soil building product, and is used to quickly stimulate microbes in the soil and give an indirect benefit of fertility. It also in many cases will run fire ants off the property. It should be used at 10 - 20 lbs. per 1000 sq ft. It can also be beneficial on acreage at rates as low as 100 - 200 lbs. per acre. You may need to recall your algebra skills to see how much you need.

Here’s some help:  1 acre = 43,560 sq ft.
If you use the 10 - 20 lb/ 1,000 sq ft rate; 10 - 20 lbs/ 1,000 sq ft x 43,560 sq ft / acre x 2.25 acres = 980 - 1,960 lbs.

if you use the lower application rate; 100 - 200 lbs/acre x 2.25 acres = 225 - 500 lbs of molasses. Either way, you are going to need to go back to the store.

This link to dirtdoctor.com has more information about using dry molasses.

 

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