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Mr. Smarty Plants - Manor, TX in Blackland Prairie ecoregion

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Tuesday - June 27, 2006

From: Manor, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Herbs/Forbs, Trees
Title: Manor, TX in Blackland Prairie ecoregion
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hi, I am planning an event for my community in Shadowglen and Manor, TX so my neighbors can learn about using native plants in the landscape to create healthier habitat for wildlife and be more responsible stewards of the land. I have a speaker that will give a talk on the Blackland Prairie and I just wanted to find a way to be SURE that we are indeed in the blackland prairie. I know my soil is pretty dark gray and very clayey. The native plants I have seen in the vicinity of the neighborhood are prairie verbena and lots of sunflowers, Bois d'arc, mesquite, possibly post oak, frogfruit and winecup. We live by the intersection of Wilbarger Creek and HWY 290 in Manor, TX. My question is "Are we in the Blackland Prairie ecoregion?" I would hate to put on this event and find that we are really on the edge of Post Oak Savannah and have been giving the wrong talks to folks. Thank you Holly

ANSWER:

Yes, you do live in the Blackland Prairie ecoregion. Manor is in the northeastern portion of Travis County and you can see in the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department's Gould Ecoregions of Texas map that the eastern (approximately 1/2) portion of Travis County is the Blackland Prairie ecoregion.

Congratulations and best of luck in your efforts to promote the use of native plants in the landscape.

 

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