En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - January 26, 2012

From: Carrollton, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Pruning, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Care for indoor ivy from Carollton TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have an indoor ivy that is on a pole. The pole is breaking, and I need to separate the ivy from the pole with the least amount of trauma to the plant. How should I do this? Thanks!

ANSWER:

Most indoor plants are non-native to North America. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, home of Mr. Smarty Plants, promotes the growth, propagation and protection of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which it is being grown. Apparently, indoor ivies are mostly Hedera helix, native to Europe and and western Asia, and therefore fall out of our frame of reference.

Hedera helix, often referred to as English ivy, is widely grown in North America and is considered extremely invasive if grown outdoors. Apparently, keeping it in a pot indoors makes this consideration irrelevant. From the Guide to Houseplants, we found this article on English Ivy Plant Care. We found no direct reference to avoiding damage when removing a support, but we found lots of recommendations that it be kept pruned, with dead leaves removed, etc. If the plant is doing well where it is presently growing, our recommendation would be to prune back branches of the ivy which are attached to the support, remove the damaged support, and let the ivy re-grow. Just don't plant it outside, it will take over your world.

Pictures

 

 

More Invasive Plants Questions

More information on coltsfoot in Rindge NH
July 28, 2009 - I wanted to give input regarding the query from Barbara Medford about: Coltsfoot invasive in Rindge NH Tuesday - July 21, 2009. I think it likely that the coltsfoot she described is Tussilago farfara...
view the full question and answer

Controlling vegetation around retention pond in Williamsburg, VA
September 21, 2009 - We planted Juncus effusus around a retention pond and various native shrubs last year. We are having a problem controlling bramble,lespedeza and broadleaf natives from taking over and native trees(wil...
view the full question and answer

Control of white clover (Trifolium repens)
July 18, 2008 - our yard was remediated by ARCO in Rico Colorado. they brought in soil that must have been from clover fields. the soil produces tense low growing and fast growing clover with white flowers. it is inv...
view the full question and answer

Need to know about the invasiveness of Datura wrightii.
May 17, 2010 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, I recently purchased a small Datura wrightii plant for my front garden. I've been researching it, since I know it is quite toxic, and couldn't find a good answer to one quest...
view the full question and answer

Prairie remnant threatened by non-native Queen Anne's lace in Dallas
June 09, 2010 - A blackland prairie remnant is being invaded by Queen Ann's Lace. What are the best, least chemical, methods of getting rid of it without damaging the native grasses and wildflowers? Thank you!
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center