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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - November 17, 2011

From: Florence, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Drought Tolerant, Turf, Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Drought tolerant grass with little need for mowing for Hill Country of Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What grass would you recommend for the hill country of Texas that is drought tolerant and does not need frequent mowing?

ANSWER:

HABITURF™ is the grass for you!  It is a mixture of three native grasses—Bouteloua dactyloides (Buffalograss), Bouteloua gracilis (Blue grama) and Hilaria belangeri (Curly mesquite grass).  The Wildflower Center has been developing this grass mixture since 2007.  Once established it requires little water and little mowing.  It likes full sun but will do well in areas that get sun 50% of the time.  For more information about its features, starting and maintaining it, please read the brochure and our How to Article, Native Lawns:  Multi-species.  Seeds are available at Douglas King Company and Native American Seed (under the name "Thunder Turf").

 

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