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Friday - October 28, 2011

From: Westminster, MD
Region: Select Region
Topic: Invasive Plants, Non-Natives, Trees
Title: Control of Paulownia tomentosa from Westminster MD
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have heard that there is a type of herbicide that is to be applied to slashes made in the outer layer of invasive trees such as Paulownia. This type of application is reputed to prevent the little seedlings that sprout from the roots if the Paulownia is simply cut to the ground. Do you have suggestions?

ANSWER:

Let us start by saying there are two things we don't like-the first is the use of non-native plants, such as Paulownia tomentosa, Princess Tree. The second thing we don't like is trying chemical fixes that endanger other plants, animals (including humans) and the environment. From Texasinvasives.org, in which the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower is an active partner, read this information from the Texas Invasives Database.  Mr. Smarty Plants never recommends plants that are neither native to North America nor to the areas in which they grow naturally. One of the main reasons for this is the possibility of invasiveness, taking over and pushing out natives that are adapted to the climate, moisture and soils of the area.

We do not pretend to be an expert nor to have any experience with the methods suggested but we will refer you to a couple of websites that seem to contain the information to which you are referring:

DCNR Invasive Exotic Plant Tutorial, Species management and control information on Paulonia tomentosa

From the University of Kentucky, Forest Health-Invasive Plant Hit List: Paulownia

We urge you to read all the information on these websites before making any kind of decision, and also to consult with a trained and licensed professional in the application of herbicides. We also frequently recommend that you start with the local Extension office, which may be able to steer you in the right direction on local laws and rules on herbicides. Your office is University of Maryland Extension Office for Carroll Co.

One last word: the best way to deal with an invasive plant is to never plant it!

 

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