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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Friday - September 30, 2011

From: Groton, MA
Region: Northeast
Topic: Plant Lists, Meadow Gardens, Wildflowers
Title: Blue wildflowers for Massachusetts meadow garden
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am restoring a 1980's era barn in Massachusetts. To celebrate the roll-out of the restored barn, I would like to plant wildflowers in the hayfield next to the barn (aprox. 3 acres). I would like to plant primarily blue flowers for 2012 and then red/pink/white for 2013. Do you have any suggestions for wildflowers in northern MA that are blue?

ANSWER:

Indeed we do, but you can also search for them yourself by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database.  Choose "Massachusetts" in the Select State or Province slot, "Herb" in the Habit (general appearance) slot and "Blue" under Bloom Characteristics–Bloom Color.  There are also other criteria you can use as choices, such as Light Requirement and Soil Moisture.  Here are a few possibilities from the list:

Campanula rotundifolia (Bluebell bellflower)

Houstonia caerulea (Azure bluet)

Lupinus perennis (Sundial lupine)

Scutellaria integrifolia (Helmet flower)

Viola sororia (Missouri violet)

When you get ready to choose your red, pink and white flowers you can repeat the process. 

Since you are planting wildflowers in your hayfield, you might also like to read our article, Meadow Gardening, for useful tips on how to make a successful meadow garden.

 

From the Image Gallery


Bluebell bellflower
Campanula rotundifolia

Azure bluet
Houstonia caerulea

Sundial lupine
Lupinus perennis

Helmet-flower
Scutellaria integrifolia

Missouri violet
Viola sororia

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