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Tuesday - September 27, 2011

From: Tulsa, OK
Region: Southwest
Topic: Planting, Trees
Title: Looking for a redbud sized tree to plant in Tulsa OK.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I am looking for a native tree about the size of a redbud to place in my prairie bed in Tulsa Oklahoma, wildlife friendly trees preferred, thanks!

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants is wondering; why not plant a Redbud?

There are three varieties of Redbud for you to consider: the Eastern redbud Cercis canadensis (Eastern redbud), the Texas redbud Cercis canadensis var. texensis (Texas redbud), and the Mexican redbud Cercis canadensis var. mexicana (Mexican redbud). The Mexican variety is smaller, and it grows in South Texas and into Mexico. This site from the University of Connecticut lists several cultivars of Eastern Redbud that are available.

Going to our Native Plants Database and using the Combination Search feature can give you a list of trees in the same size class a Redbud. To use this feature, go to the Database and scroll down to the Combination Search box. Select Oklahoma under State, Tree under Habit, and Perennial under Duration. Check 12-36 ft under size characteristics and click the Submit combination Search button. This will give you a list of 51 native species that are found in the state of Oklahoma. Clicking on the scientific name of of each plant will bring up its NPIN page which contains a description of the plant including its size, flowering characteristics, growth requirements, and photos. As you go through the list, try to match the plant to the growing conditions where it will be planted.

I am including the answer to a previous question. The question was from Virginia, but the person was looking for the same kind of information you are.

 

From the Image Gallery


Eastern redbud
Cercis canadensis

Texas redbud
Cercis canadensis var. texensis

Mexican redbud
Cercis canadensis var. mexicana

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