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Wednesday - September 07, 2011

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Diseases and Disorders, Trees
Title: Sap oozing from non-native Chinese pistache in San Antonio
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I live in San Antonio, and my chinese pistache is exuding copious amounts of a sticky sap from old trim sites and from the trunk itself. The tree is about 12 years old and has been healthy up until now. I'm sure the drought has weakened it some. Please tell me what could be causing this oozing. Bugs or disease?

ANSWER:

Pistacia chinensis, Chinese Pistache is native to (where else) central and western China. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is devoted to the growth and care of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they grow natively, so this tree is out of our realm of expertise. However, we do consider it invasive, and would prefer it not be planted nor propagated. We have answered a number of questions about this tree, and are going to give you links to those answers, in hopes you will find the information you need.

Austin, TX

Texas Invasives.org on Pistacia chinensis

Kerrville, TX

Plant files from Dave's Garden: Read especially the 5 negative comments

From University of California Integrated Pest Management Pests and Diseases of Pistachia Chinensis.

Finally, we suggest you contact the Texas A&M AgriLIFE Extension Office for Bexar County.

 

 

 

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