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Saturday - September 03, 2011

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Vines
Title: Propagation of Crossvine from San Antonio
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a new Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) that has a single seedpod so far. What is the best way to plant it for the best chances for success? It is still green and a very hot August. Do I plant in fall? Spring?

ANSWER:

Our Native Plant Database page on Bignonia capreolata (Crossvine) (which read by clicking on link) has this propagation information for this vine:

"Propagation

Propagation Material: Root Cuttings, Seeds , Softwood Cuttings
Seed Collection: Collect the large, woody capsules from late summer through fall when they are light brown and beginning to dry. Seeds remain viable one year in sealed, refrigerated containers.
Seed Treatment: Seed requires no pretreatment.
Commercially Avail: yes
Maintenance: Training to avoid crowding of stems will aid in the formation of flower shoots. Branches can be cut back in the spring to encourage flowering."

As mild a climate as San Antonio has, we believe you could go ahead and plant the seeds in the soil as instructed above or make starter pots, in the Fall after the heat subsides, which we trust it eventually will.

From Virginia Tech, picture of mature seed.

 

From the Image Gallery


Crossvine
Bignonia capreolata

Crossvine
Bignonia capreolata

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