En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - August 12, 2011

From: Casper, WY
Region: Rocky Mountain
Topic: Pests, Drought Tolerant
Title: Antelope Resistant Plants for Casper, Wyoming
Answered by: Brigid & Larry Larson

QUESTION:

What are some drought resistant, full-sun plants for Wyoming that are Antelope resistant - Deer are not much of a problem, but antelope are!

ANSWER:

We can certainly suggest some native, drought-resistant, full sun plants.  Antelope resistant seems to be a much harder question!

So, lets take the easy one first.   If you go to our "Recommended Species" page, you can select Wyoming as the state of interest.  Then you can also narrow your search by selecting "full sun" and "dry".  This still left 48 species to consider when I tried it. 

As I mentioned above, antelope resistance is not in the data that is often attached to plant descriptions.  I did find two resources that might be helpful.  There was an article in the Journal of Wildlife Management that discusses antelope forage. It said that they prefer Grass in the Spring, and Black Sagebrush in Fall/Winter. Sadly, they concluded "succulence appears to be the major characteristic  of the forage sought by antelope".  Which means to me that if it is green & healthy, they will like it!  I also found an Extension Bulletin that listed food habits and actual species.  The one thing I noticed was that they prefer shorter plants, 15" or less, and avoided plantings with foliage 30" or greater.  I've put images of three candidates for you, 30" tall or higher and adapted to hot & dry conditions below.

I hope that helps a little bit.  You probably could do well to consult local experts.  The University of Wyoming supports Extension Offices in most of the Counties.  The Natona County Expension Office should be local to you.

 

From the Image Gallery


Common yarrow
Achillea millefolium

Saskatoon serviceberry
Amelanchier alnifolia

Shadscale
Atriplex confertifolia

More Drought Tolerant Questions

Blue plants or flowers in Baltimore, MD
July 27, 2007 - I have a taxi company in the city called Bluecab. The headquarters is in an industrial area and the soil is tough and well, industrial. There will be no watering or maintenance done. Looks like a car ...
view the full question and answer

Drought-resistant ground cover for Massachusetts
July 11, 2012 - Mr Smarty Plants I am looking for drought resistant,low maintenance ground cover for a LEED certified project in Florence MA. Any suggestions?
view the full question and answer

Long Island Barrier Beach Plants
April 22, 2013 - I live on the south shore of Long Island on a barrier beach and am landscaping my property as a result of Sandy damage. I am going with a sand base, and I am looking for suitable trees and shrubs for...
view the full question and answer

Landscaping plant for Austin
September 01, 2011 - Great site! Have gotten lots of ideas. We're about to start construction on a fairly major landscaping project: raised beds/privacy screen. We're at the top of a hill in the Hill Country just wes...
view the full question and answer

Cenizos browning in Houston
October 01, 2011 - After this horrible drought, I am committed to xeriscaping with native Texas plants. The few hibiscus that survived have been transplanted into pots and are thriving. I bid the tiny boxwoods a fond fa...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center