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Tuesday - July 26, 2011

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Rare or Endangered Plants, Trees
Title: Texas madrone trimmings for a wedding
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Looking for Texas madrone tree trimmings needed for a special wedding.

ANSWER:

We believe you are mistaking Mr. Smarty Plants for a forum-type website, in which people post comments and requests. Our function is to answer questions on native plants in North America, their care and protection. We don't know of any Texas area forum where you could post your request, and believe you would have some difficulty getting anyone to give up trimmings of this tree, even if they were doing trimming in this terrible heat. It blooms white February to April, which means it is finished blooming for this year, and the foliage itself is nothing remarkable. The most noteworthy thing about this tree is its peeling bark, often revealing a red trunk, which has led to the common name "Naked Indian."

From our website on Arbutus xalapensis (Texas madrone): "Conditions Comments: One of the most interesting and beautiful native trees of Texas, but temperamental to propagate or grow. Propagation requirements are complex, and it is very difficult to transplant successfully from the wild. In the landscape, it grows best in well-drained areas."

From the US Forest Service Index of Species on Texas Madrone: "Texas madrone is listed as an endangered species by the Texas Organization for Endangered Species."

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas madrone
Arbutus xalapensis

Texas madrone
Arbutus xalapensis

Texas madrone
Arbutus xalapensis

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