En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Plant Identification

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - July 14, 2011

From: Kingsland, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Plant Identification
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is the common purple flower found in fields that has a yellow flattened oval berry like pod after blooming? Leaves are grayish green. I am thinking in the nightshade family? It is a bane to a pasture and we would like to know how to eradicate it in the most benign way in order to have a better hay harvest. Any tips there would be greatly appreciated! Thank you for your help!

ANSWER:

This sounds like Solanum elaeagnifolium (Silverleaf nightshade).  It is considered a noxious weed in several states in North America where it is native.   In other countries it is considered an invasive non-native plant.   Here is information from the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO) on silverleaf nightshade's geographical, biology and means of eradication.  There are several reasons to eradicate it from areas where food crops for humans and livestock are grown—it competes for moisture and nutrients of the crops you are growing for hay; it may inhibit the growth of some plants (allelopathy); and it (especially the fruits) is considered toxic for livestock so you certainly don't want it mixed in with your hay.  The EPPO admits that this plant is difficult to eradicate.  Both the EPPO and Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board report that herbicides are not very effective in controlling it.  The most benign way to get rid of the plant is to pull or dig up the plants and dispose of them.  Depending on how large your area is and how much help you have, this may or may not be feasible.  Once you have removed them, you will need to monitor for new plants.  The plants do pull up relatively easily; however, you need to wear heavy gloves to pull them because the stem has sharp spines.  Merely cutting them will not eradicate them since they can regrow from the stems and roots.

 

From the Image Gallery


Silverleaf nightshade
Solanum elaeagnifolium

Silverleaf nightshade
Solanum elaeagnifolium

Silverleaf nightshade
Solanum elaeagnifolium

More Plant Identification Questions

Plant Identification in Tennessee
September 02, 2008 - I live in upper East Tennessee and all my life I have seen a flowering bush we call a Bubbie (or Bubby). It grows to an average approximate height of 6 feet and blooms in the early summer. The blooms ...
view the full question and answer

Tentative identification of Viola sagittata
June 23, 2007 - I am trying to find name of wildflower, Violet growing in adjoning woods. I have not been able to find it on internet. The non-basal leaves are very irregular in shape, grow to six inches, no two ali...
view the full question and answer

Identity of sunflower
November 02, 2012 - I am not able to find how to post a picture to help you identify a plant on our campus. I believe the plant I am trying to identify is a rough sunflower. (Helianthus hirsutus) We have zexmenia as ...
view the full question and answer

Plant identification
June 25, 2008 - Identification of woodland plant in a rual area ? we have bears britches and another plant simaler, but the leaves are flat and smooth, each leaf is on a seperate stalk and each plant has 3 stalk...
view the full question and answer

Identification of small tree in Florida
August 31, 2012 - I live in Port Saint Lucie, FL. We have a few trees (?) growing in our yard I would like to i.d. They seem to grow quickly have smooth leaves that grow opposite one another and the underside of the ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center