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Mr. Smarty Plants - A&M maroon bluebonnets for Hawaii

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Sunday - July 10, 2011

From: Houston, TX
Region: Hawaii
Topic: Invasive Plants, Wildflowers
Title: A&M maroon bluebonnets for Hawaii
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

My daughter graduated from Texas A&M and has moved to Hawaii. She would love to have the maroon bluebonnets developed by A&M to plant in her new home. How would she need to prepare the seeds since there is no winter there? What restrictions would there be in importing seeds to Hawaii in accordance with their laws?

ANSWER:

Ohhhh, noooo! Another request for bluebonnets (that are maroon) for a place where they don't belong!! We get requests, for the blue ones at least, from New York, Alaska, Germany, England, Afghanistan and many other exotic locations from homesick Texans. Alas, our magic wand is in the shop and we don't think it can be pulled off. However, first you (and/or your daughter) should read our How-To Article on How to Grow Bluebonnets.  Now, from the Aggie Horticulture Archives, Colorization of the State Flower. Also, from Aggie Horticulture, The Real Story of Maroon Bluebonnets. And, finally, from the Texas bluebonnet Seed Company, The Aggiebonnet.

On your question about importing seeds into Hawaii, here are some resources:

University of Hawaii College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Advice on Obtaining Seeds of Plants for Conservation

Hawaii Department of Agriculture Plant Guidelines for Importation to Hawaii

The most important thing we want to say to you is that the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, propagation and protection of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they are being grown. Hawaii's beautiful native horticulture is severely threatened by the invasiveness of plants from other parts of the world. The lush lava-based soils and generous rains could easily cause the Aggiebonnet to go wild, literally. We would hate to think of even a funny-colored bluebonnet becoming an alien invasive in another beautiful state.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

Texas bluebonnet
Lupinus texensis

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