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Thursday - July 07, 2011

Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Pruning, Herbs/Forbs, Shrubs
Title: Need some help with my Mexican Bush Sage in Rockport, TX.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills


My Mexican bush sage looks leggy,ratty and sparse. It's planted in full sun and was cut back to the ground in early spring. My soil is sand and I've watered it sparingly as we've had no rain. I'm about ready to rip it out, any ideas? Thanks for your time.


Mexican bush sage (Salvia leucantha), is native to Mexico and Central America, and therefore isn’t in our Native Plants Database which would include information on growing conditions. The link above indicates that the plant prefers full sun, and evenly moist, well drained soil. Sand is certainly well drained, but probably could stand some amending to improve moisture levels.
This link has a video about pruning that could help improve your plant's appearance.

Try to hold off on ripping it out until after it blooms in the late summer. This information from Floridata might give you some hope.


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