En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Monday - May 29, 2006

From: Glenview, IL
Region: Midwest
Topic: Transplants, Shade Tolerant
Title: Saving or transplanting stand of white trillium that has lost shade
Answered by: Joe Marcus and Dean Garrett

QUESTION:

We have a generous stand of white trillium that has been under the shade of a white oak for many years. Now the 100+ year old oak has died and the trilliums are in the sun. Are we in danger of losing them? If so, how do we save them? We have heard transplanting is very difficult and thought if we planted huge hostas like the sum and substance around the trillium that the hosta would provide shade. What do you think and do you have a better suggestion?

ANSWER:

Trilliums prefer to be on the floor of mature, hardwood, primarily deciduous forests in some amount of shade. If they are now in full sun throughout the day, they may very well expire. However, if they're still getting dappled shade from other neighboring trees or shrubs, especially during the hottest part of the day, they may pull through. Hostas might work, but it's hard to know for sure.

What would probably be better in the long run would be to plant native deciduous trees or shrubs near them, tall enough to provide at least dappled shade from the outset. That way, the woody plants' leaves will provide the kind of shade with which the trilliums have evolved and will also enrich the soil when they drop in the fall, contributing to the kind of woodland soil to which trilliums are accustomed.

The Illinois Plant Information Network notes that Trillium grandiflorum, the best known white trillium and one native to your state, is often found growing among the following trees and shrubs:

American Beech (Fagus grandifolia)
Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra)
Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum)
White Ash (Fraxinus americana)
American Basswood (Tilia americana)

Planting young specimens of one or two of those trees, tall enough to provide shade during the day, is one idea. Our Native Plant Database can help you learn about the many other kinds of deciduous trees and shrubs native to your area, and our National Suppliers Directory can help you locate plants when it's time to purchase.

If you do decide to attempt transplanting, it's best to wait until the plants go dormant and then get as much of the root and surrounding soil as possible. A local chapter of your state's native plant society or of the Wild Ones may be able to give you more information on how best to do this, if at all. Many native plant societies do plant rescues and they may well have had experience salvaging trilliums in your area.

 

More Transplants Questions

Dying branches on Texas Mountain Laurel from Kempner TX
September 14, 2012 - The branches on my Texas Mountain Laurel are very dry and brittle. The leaves are also starting to die. The tree has been in my yard for six years and prior to that it sat wrapped in burlap for ov...
view the full question and answer

Post-bloom period care for Pink evening primrose
June 28, 2011 - Hello, I live in Denton, TX. I introduced pink evening primrose as a ground cover to a xeriscaped section of my property a few years ago. I have pretty much left it alone and let it do its thing an...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting Trillium in Quebec.
May 13, 2009 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, I live in the Laurentiens of Quebec where they are putting a HWY in my back yard. I have a lot of white trillium that I am wanting to transplant before they start the excava...
view the full question and answer

Amendments for faster-growing trees from Bulverde TX
July 04, 2010 - What faster growing trees will grow in black gumbo clay that is about 12 inches deep above caliche rock in full sun with a sprinkler system set on 1 inch/week? How many and how much amendments such...
view the full question and answer

Problems with propagation of Indian Paintbrush (Castileja indivisa)
February 07, 2006 - We are growing Indian Paintbrush. I have 2-300 seedlings. They were sown with fescue and have grown beautifully. Now they are approximately 4-6 inches high, a few have bloomed and many seem to be dy...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center