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Thursday - June 09, 2011

From: Charlottesville, VA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Non-native impatiens from Charlottesville VA
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Question about type of impatiens. My Alabama mother grew these and called them touch-me-not. They grow about 2 feet tall and blooms grow UNDER the leaf canopy up the stem. Colors I have are pale pink and fushia. Seed pods are similar to common impatiens only larger. What lighting and other conditions are needed?

ANSWER:

According to this Dave's Garden forum, Impatiens balsamina has the common name of "touch-me-not." According to this USDA Plant Profile, its common name is "spotted snapweed."

This plant is native to Tropical Asia, including India and Myanmar. As such, they do not fall into our realm of expertise, nor appear in our Native Plant Database. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is committed to the growth, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they are being grown. Here is an article on How to Care for Impatiens which we hope will help you.

 

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