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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Monday - May 23, 2005

From: Los Fresnsos, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Locations where non-native Mimosa trees grow
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Where do mimos trees grow?

ANSWER:

I think you must thinking of mimosa trees. Mimosa or silktree (Albizia julibrissin) trees are native to Asia and belong to the Family Fabaceae (Pea Family). A similar, but less common species, is the Kalkora mimosa (Albizia kalkora). Both are non-native trees introduced to North America and now can be found growing in the south, southwest and northeast United States. They are considered invasive in Florida, Tennessee, and the Mid-Atlantic. More information about the invasive nature of the mimosa tree can be found at Texas Invasives.org.

Members of the Genus Mimosa (also in the Family Fabaceae) are small, usually low-growing, plants with flowers similar to the mimosa tree. Many species of these are native to North America.
 

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