En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Tuesday - May 31, 2011

From: Albuquerque, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Ivy with holes in its leaves
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Mr. Smarty Pants, Please help me, I was given an ivy (origin unknown). It is peculiar. It has holes in the leaves, not from bugs or from bacteria, etc. It is natural, the holes develop in some type of semi scattered pattern. There are holes all over each leaf but the holes tend to be pretty standard in size (varying little). Could you please tell me what kind of ivy this is????? I would be happy to provide pictures if that would help. Thank you.

ANSWER:

Your ivy sounds very interesting but it doesn't sound like any ivy native to North America that I can think of.   What we are all about here at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is studying, protecting and promoting the conservation and use of North American native plants and landscapes.  You can see more than sixty native vines that occur in New Mexico by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database and selecting New Mexico in the Select State or Province slot and "Vine" under Habit (general appearance).  I didn't see any vines in these 60+ species that matched your description.  You can visit our Plant Identification page to find links to several plant identification forums that allow you to submit photos of plants for identification and these forums are not limited to North American natives.

 

More Plant Identification Questions

Is Talinum paniculatum native to Central Texas?
September 02, 2012 - I just bought a plant in Austin called Talinum paniculatum, Jewels of Opar. We are adamant about growing only local natives in the yard so it will have to be a potted plant unless you can verif...
view the full question and answer

Visual differences among members of the Apiaceae
July 21, 2012 - What is the visual difference between queen anne's lace and hemlock and cowslip parsley? I live in Marin county, California and have often been confused as to which is what? Thank you!
view the full question and answer

Are Brown-eyed susans and Black-eyed susans the same species?
December 02, 2014 - Are Brown eyed Susans the same as the Black-eyed Susan? I've read that they are both common names for the same plant, but the flower looks slightly different in different regions. Thank you.
view the full question and answer

Identification of plant in Illinois
August 13, 2007 - I've found a plant that I cannot identify. The plant is is very short, 2 inches tall maybe, and has very fragile, thin leaves and stem. The leaves about 1" long, are pinnate, with about 20 leaflets ...
view the full question and answer

Plant with orange berries in Oregon
August 24, 2009 - I have a viney type plant that hangs down over and along a rock wall at my house in Portland, that is producing an orange colored berry. What is it? Is it edible? My neighbor just tried one and he ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center