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Wednesday - May 18, 2011

From: Gulfport, MS
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Non-native invasive Chocolate Mimosa in Gulfport MS
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Another Mimosa Question: I have a newly planted chocolate mimosa; it has a single, 7 ft spindly trunk with approximately a 3 ft canopy. I'm afraid that its girth will not withstand much in terms of weather; is there a method to prune this single trunk to encourage more girth and perhaps branching of the canopy? Appreciate any information.

ANSWER:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the care and propagation of plants native to North America. Albizia julibrissin (mimosa, silk tree) is a native of Asia from Iran east to China and Korea. Cultivar "Chocolate Mimosa" was developed in Japan and begun recently being imported into the United States. Not only is the mimosa a non-native, but it is on many invasives list; that is, native plant people not only don't recommend you plant it, they recommend you remove it if you've already planted it. See this website from the Plant Conservation Alliance on "Least Wanted" mimosa.


 

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