En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - June 06, 2011

From: Elgin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Erosion Control
Title: Preventing Soil Erosion in Elgin, Texas
Answered by: Mike Tomme

QUESTION:

I live in Elgin,TX and our property is basically a slope with dense oak and cedar trees on the back of the property. The soil is sandy loam. What type of native plants or grasses can I plant to stop soil erosion. The plants or grasses will have dappled to dense shade. Thanks

ANSWER:

Rather than start from scratch, Mr. Smarty Plants is going to refer you to a couple of previously answered questions about situations similar to yours. These two answers will give you a good education in growing native grasses in the shade.

First question

Second question

Almost anything you plant will help prevent soil erosion, so your main criteria for selecting native plants should be shade and sandy soil conditions. Here's how the native plant database can help:

Go to Wildflower.org, then click on explore plants and plant database. Click on the central Texas region of the map. This will produce a list of plants recommended for the region. Narrow your results by selecting shade under Light Requirements and the growth habit of the plant (herb, shrub, tree, etc.) you would prefer under General Appearance. You can further limit your search by selecting your favorite bloom color and the time of year the blooms appear.

Here are a few central Texas favorites that would do well in your situation:


Salvia coccinea


Coreopsis lanceolata


Malvaviscus arboreus

 

 

 

More Erosion Control Questions

Smoky Mountains Shaded Slope Plant Suggestions
April 29, 2013 - We live in a very shady spot in Great Smoky Mountains in Western North Carolina. We would like to plant vegetation on a sloped area behind our cottage to stop erosion after building an addition. Our h...
view the full question and answer

Getting rid of non-native, invasive English Ivy from Davidsonville MD
March 19, 2014 - Just moved and need to rid the well established Ivy planted on the steep slope area around the back and side of the house as it is taking over the bushes on the top and trees in forested area at botto...
view the full question and answer

Native Streambank Plants for SE Pennsylvania
July 18, 2013 - I help manage a nature preserve in southeastern Pennsylvania. Along the stream the banks have been beaten down by a large number of visitors for their educational activities such as stream studies. Th...
view the full question and answer

Limiting erosion around pond from Brooklyn Park MN
May 20, 2013 - Minnesota resident, wants to find plant limit erosion from pond?
view the full question and answer

Plants for bridge foundation erosion control in WV .
July 05, 2010 - There is a stream on my property that I must cross to get to my house from the road (stream is about 6 - 8 feet wide, with 5 to 6 foot banks). I've recently had to have the bridge repaired, and the ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center