En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - May 11, 2011

From: Gilbert, AZ
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders
Title: Something eating Arizona ash in Gilbert AZ
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Something is eating my Arizona ash tree. what should I spray on it?

ANSWER:

The first thing we do when we are trying to diagnose a problem with a plant is to find out if it is native to the area where it is growing. A plant growing where it is not native may be having trouble with soil that has the wrong pH, or less rainfall that the plant is accustomed to, extreme heat, extreme cold, etc. However, the Fraxinus velutina (Arizona ash) does, indeed, grow natively in Maricopa Co., Arizona.

The main pest we found mentioned in connection with the genus Fraxinus is the borer, and the worst of the borers is the Emerald Ash Borer, from an Invasive.org article on the problem. These are introduced beetles from Asia that came into the United States in about 2002 on wood used in cargo bays of ships. The early mentions of this bug are all centered in the Northeast and Midwest, but we understand it is spreading fast.

Since we are not entomologists, we suggest you contact the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Office for Maricopa Co.  They are closer to the problem and can probably tell you very quickly what is making holes in your tree and what you can do about it.

 

More Diseases and Disorders Questions

Yellowing of St. Augustine grass in south Texas
June 04, 2009 - We live in deep south Texas, Roma, Texas to be precise and we have a problem with our San Augustine grass. In the spring its quite nice and green after a few weeks and one rain it is turning yellow.
view the full question and answer

Problems with October Glory maple tree in Evansville IN
June 10, 2010 - We have a 15 yr. old October Glory maple tree. 2 years ago we had a bad ice storm and this tree was covered with 1/2 to 3/4 " of ice. The tree resembled a chicken wishbone with its limbs touching ...
view the full question and answer

Problems with Savannah Holly plants in Friendswood, TX.
June 17, 2009 - I have planted 4 savannah hollies in front of my house, two on the left of the door and two on the right. If you are standing in front of my house and looking at the door, the sun rises at the back l...
view the full question and answer

Information about giant yellow and black wasps
September 13, 2008 - Regarding a previous question submitted by a person asking about the giant yellow and black wasps..It's a Cicada Killer.I used to see them all the time when I was a kid in Victoria, Tx..But I haven'...
view the full question and answer

Sudden death of one side of Mountain Laurel from Canyon Lake TX
July 22, 2013 - Hello! We live in Canyon Lake TX and have a Mountain Laurel that is in distress. It is planted in an irrigated flower bed and has been happily growing for 5 years. It is about 5' tall and has sever...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center