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Wednesday - May 11, 2011

From: Rushsylvania, OH
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Are non-native Cleveland pear trees poisonous to dogs in Rushsylvania, OH
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Are Cleveland pear trees poisonous to dogs?

ANSWER:

"Cleveland pear" and its predecessor "Bradford pear" are both trade names for selections of Pyrus calleryana, which is native to temperate and tropical Asia. Our understanding is that the Cleveland Pear does not bear fruit, but such hybrids have been known to revert to fruiting. The fruit is not considered edible, but might be by dogs.

The five lists below are good references when you are checking on the possibility of toxicity in plants accessible to pets.

Cornell University Plants Poisonous to Livestock

University of Pennsylvania Poisonous Plants

Toxic Plants of Texas

Poisonous Plants and Mushrooms of North Carolina

ASPCA's Toxic and Non-Toxic Plant List – Dogs

We did not find Pyrus calleryana listed in any of these lists as being poisonous.

 

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