En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - May 03, 2011

From: Cedar Creek, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Pests, Trees
Title: Possible sawflies on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda)
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

My pine trees looked great a week ago, now one from top to bottom is almost without needles. It is covered with greenish caterpillars. They have several stripes down their back . Could these be saw flies? These are large loblolly pines, about 50 ft tall. We have watered the trees and spread compost yearly and trees looked well. What can I do and is it too late? We never use chemical controls and always try natural and organic methods. Thanks so much.

ANSWER:

Your description does sound like one of the pine sawflies such as Neodiprion taedae linearis (loblolly pine sawfly) or Neodiprion lecontei (redheaded red pine sawfly).  Indeed, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension issued a Sawfly Alert on April 27, 2011. Here is an article, Pine Sawflies, from the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and here is information from the U. S. Forest Service and from Ohio State University Extension about the life cycle, damage to trees and control measures for N. lecontei. The good news is that the U. S. Forest Service says that southern pines—this includes Pinus taeda (Loblolly pine)—can survive complete defoliation.  The April 2009 article, Pine sawfly in northeast Texas, from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension says that pines that are defoliated usually recover.  Both the U. S. Forest Service and Ohio State University Extension offer suggestions for biological and mechanical control measures as well as chemical treatments.  You may be able to use mechanical means to remove the larvae; but since your infestation sounds very heavy, you might want to consider using chemical means to control them.  The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension articles above suggest effective pesticides and "Insect and Mite Control on Woody Ornamentals and Herbaceous Perennials" from Ohio State University Extension has general information on chemical as well as other treatments.

 

More Pests Questions

Something dripping from red oak in Austin
July 30, 2012 - There is a large red oak outside my apartment. The leaves are shiny and covered with what appears to be oil. The ground underneath is coated with this also. When I parked under the tree my car beca...
view the full question and answer

Plants that animals won't eat from Ione WA
April 19, 2013 - In Ione Washington and need to know what types of plants and flowers I can plant that animals in that area wont eat?
view the full question and answer

Red bugs have appeared on my Texas mountain laurel
April 10, 2016 - What should I do about the red bugs on my mountain laurel?
view the full question and answer

Crape myrtle in Austin
August 01, 2012 - Please don't bother to answer my question about how to treat a crepe myrtle with sticky stuff falling from it. I just found the answer on your site. Good site, by the way.
view the full question and answer

Caterpillars eating passion vines from Austin
May 17, 2012 - My question concerns Yellow passion flower, purple passion vine & butterflies. I have had my passion vines for 3-4 years, each spring they start growing beautifully, then in 1-2 days are almost compl...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center