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Saturday - April 23, 2011

From: Ellijay, GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Invasive Plants
Title: Removal of Invasive Mint
Answered by: Brigid & Larry Larson

QUESTION:

The herb Mint is taking over my flower garden. How can I kill this out? Thank you,

ANSWER:

Mr Smarty Plants and the Wildflower Center are really not into herbs, although many species of native plants are in the mint family.  You must be giving them excellent conditions to thrive if they have become such a problem.  Unfortunately, the choices on how to remove them are somewhat limited:  keep digging, remove all runners and roots, repeat.

I checked for earlier questions that are somewhat similar on Mr Smarty Plants.  The first one was on Removal of invasive Mints from a garden. It had pretty much the same answer that I just gave you.  There was another question about Invasive Native Mint in Ohio; in this one they asked about mint in a pasture, so more aggressive solutions were noted, but it still appears quite difficult.

As noted in those answers – it is best if you want some mint, to grow them in pots to contain their spread. You can also  join your local herb society and share your bounty with them. If you need more expert, local help, your Extension Office should be the Gilmer County Extension Office, right there in Ellijay.

 

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