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Monday - May 01, 2006

From: Pflugerville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Wildlife uses of wildflowers in Central Texas
Answered by: Dean Garrett

QUESTION:

How are wildflowers in Central Texas used by wildlife?

ANSWER:

Wildlife use Central Texas wildflowers in a variety of ways. Insects and hummingbirds may use the flowers for nectar, deer may consume the foliage, and some birds may eat the seeds.

Here's a list of some common Central Texas wildflowers from our Native Plant Information Network. If you'll click on the Benefits link on each species page, you'll be taken to a summary of the plant's usefulness to wildlife and humans.

Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja indivisa)
Mexican Hat (Ratibida columnifera)
Indian Blanket (Gaillardia pulchella)
Horsemint (Monarda citriodora)
Greenthread (Thelesperma filifolium)
Foxglove Penstemon (Penstemon cobaea)
Narrowleaf Coneflower (Echinacea angustifolia)
 

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