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Wednesday - March 23, 2011

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Problems with non-native Pink Jasmine from Austin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

A week or so ago, I purchased two beautiful pink jasmine vines. The first few days after planting, they did wonderful. Now, some leaves and stems are turning brown and some flowers have fallen off. A few leaves are half green and half brown. I watered them well when planted and once or so a few days later. What could be the problem?

ANSWER:

Jasminum polyanthum, Pink Jasmine, is native to south and east China, and is therefore out of our range of expertise. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, propagation and protection of plants native not only to North America but to the areas in which those plants are being grown.

You might want to read this website forum Dave's Garden, Pink Jasmine Jasminum polyanthum, especially the negative comments. The plant is considered invasive and can apparently actually strangle other plants around it. Also, Austin is in USDA Hardiness Zone 8b and the Pink Jasmine is hardy to Zones 9 to 11. Apparently, you bought it since our recent freezes, so it may not have been damaged in your garden, but may have been damaged wherever it was being held before it was sold.

 

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