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Monday - March 21, 2011

From: Clinton, MS
Region: Southeast
Topic: Trees
Title: Small flowering tree for MS
Answered by: Anne Bossart

QUESTION:

I had to cut down some trees that had grown too close to my foundation, but would like to re-plant something a little farther from the house (12-16 feet away) that would still serve as a screen outside my bedroom window. I would love a small flowering tree that would grow well in morning sun; the soil is slightly damp, not wet. I am open to any suggestions. I already have nearby a Japanese Magnolia, Camelia, and Redbud. On the other side of the house, I have a pink dogwood. Thank you.

ANSWER:

It sounds like you already have some nice trees on your property, but here are some small flowering trees, native to Mississippi, that would do the job for you.

Aesculus pavia (Scarlet buckeye)

Gordonia lasianthus (Gordonia)

Halesia diptera (Two-wing silverbell)

Hamamelis virginiana (Witch hazel)

Magnolia virginiana (Sweetbay)

Osmanthus americanus (Devilwood)

(this doesn't have conspicuous flowers but they are very fragrant)


Aesculus pavia


Gordonia lasianthus


Halesia diptera


Hamamelis virginiana


Magnolia virginiana


Osmanthus americanus

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

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