En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Locating yellow crossvine

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - April 20, 2006

From: Thorndale, TX
Region: Southeast
Topic: Vines
Title: Locating yellow crossvine
Answered by: Dean Garrett

QUESTION:

I am attempting to find a yellow crossvine. I am not having much luck. I thought I saw some growing in the Taylor area, but I cannot locate it now. In my memory, the flowers had brown dots on them.

ANSWER:

In the wild, crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) flowers are normally either entirely red/orange or they're red/orange on the outside with an entirely or partially yellow interior which sometimes extends out to the ends of the petals, presenting a yellow “face”. The yellow area may be a dark yellow or more of a pure yellow, sometimes with tinges of the red or orange that's on the outside of the flower. This may be what you saw. I could find no picture or description of a crossvine with entirely yellow flowers.

If you've been looking at nurseries, part of the problem may be that most of the breeding that has been done on crossvine has been for flowers that are entirely red or orange. Almost every commercial cultivar I came across when researching your question had an orange or red flower, hence the names 'Tangerine Beauty', 'Dragon Lady', and 'Atrosanguinea'. I kept hoping to come across a yellow or gold cultivar, maybe with a name something like 'Lemon Surprise', but none presented themselves.

If you haven't already done so, consult our National Suppliers Directory for nurseries in your area and contact them to find out if they carry specimens with yellow in them.

To insure that you get the coloring you want, you might also consider taking a cutting of a yellow-flowered crossvine you've seen and rooting it on your own. Locate a yellow-flowering plant in Central, Northeast, or East Texas and get permission to take a cutting (if permission is required in the area). Short, firm side stems of the current season's growth taken in late spring or summer are best. Remove at least a third of the leaves so energy can be devoted to root growth and treat the bottom end with rooting hormone. Place in loamy soil and keep moist and misted. Rooting should occur within two months.
 

More Vines Questions

Identification of vine-like plant.
November 13, 2010 - I have a an odd plant that I bought years ago. It's like a vine. It has hard rubbery like leaves they turn inward and they are green. First a cone like shape grows then the leaves grow. I would like ...
view the full question and answer

Wisteria and Non-Poisonous Native Vines
February 15, 2012 - I'm from central Texas and I'm wanting to plant a native vine that will work well around the public, mainly kids. It's a mostly sunny trellis that makes an arch. I'd like to plant the native Wiste...
view the full question and answer

Identity of vine with orangish flowers
July 09, 2014 - I am looking to ID what I believe is a vine growing plant that blooms orangish flowers. I have pictures of the plant, and have attempted to use multiple plant ID websites. But have been unsuccessful. ...
view the full question and answer

Control of invasive vine in North Carolina
November 18, 2009 - Hi, I live in Piedmont NC, have vines that twine around my shrubbery and are impossible to pull out of the ground w/o breaking because they are so thin/delicate. The leaves are maple-like (3 lobes), ...
view the full question and answer

Identification of vine growing near river in New Hampshire
August 31, 2009 - I found a small vine growing near a river in NH. It has five point leaflets similar to sumac but much smaller. The flowers were pink with a deep purple/burgundy on the inside. The flowers are in clus...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center