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Sunday - November 07, 2010

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Small flowering tree for cemetery in TX
Answered by: Anne Bossart

QUESTION:

I am looking for a native large shrub or small tree to plant at a cemetery in Pflugerville, TX, preferable something with flowers. I need something that won't have a large root system that would disturb caskets or tombstone. Would an anacacho orchid be a good choice? If not, what would you suggest.

ANSWER:

According to our Native Plant Database, Texas is the only US state where  Bauhinia lunarioides (Anacacho orchid tree) is native and it will grow to  height of 6-12 feet at maturity.

It seems to me, that it would be a fitting tribute and a suitable plant in a Texas cemetery.  It has a graceful form and delicate leaves.  It flowers generously in spring and then sporadically thorughout the rest of the growing season (there is one at the Wildflower Center that has blooms on it now).

Seeing as the tree is relatively small and root systems are in balance with the tree they must support,  there is no need for concern about the roots; assuming you have verified that planting trees in the cemetery is permitted. 

Despite its delicate appearance, it is a tough little tree.  It will need to be watered until it is established but do not fertilize it.


Bauhinia lunarioides


Bauhinia lunarioides

 

 

 

 

 

 

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