En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - November 07, 2010

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Small flowering tree for cemetery in TX
Answered by: Anne Bossart

QUESTION:

I am looking for a native large shrub or small tree to plant at a cemetery in Pflugerville, TX, preferable something with flowers. I need something that won't have a large root system that would disturb caskets or tombstone. Would an anacacho orchid be a good choice? If not, what would you suggest.

ANSWER:

According to our Native Plant Database, Texas is the only US state where  Bauhinia lunarioides (Anacacho orchid tree) is native and it will grow to  height of 6-12 feet at maturity.

It seems to me, that it would be a fitting tribute and a suitable plant in a Texas cemetery.  It has a graceful form and delicate leaves.  It flowers generously in spring and then sporadically thorughout the rest of the growing season (there is one at the Wildflower Center that has blooms on it now).

Seeing as the tree is relatively small and root systems are in balance with the tree they must support,  there is no need for concern about the roots; assuming you have verified that planting trees in the cemetery is permitted. 

Despite its delicate appearance, it is a tough little tree.  It will need to be watered until it is established but do not fertilize it.


Bauhinia lunarioides


Bauhinia lunarioides

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

When is it time to remove diseased oak trees in Belton, TX?
May 03, 2013 - When to give up on my live oaks. We lost/mostly several live oaks since 2011 and the drought. One, died from the crown, one large mass at a time, and now resembles a 10' totem pole with scraggly gro...
view the full question and answer

Madrone too close to house in Oregon
February 02, 2009 - I have a small Madrone tree (8ft tall) located approximatly 15 feet from my house, with a basement. Should I remove it? ie will it damage the foundation and is the tree strong enough that it will no...
view the full question and answer

Protecting the Texas madrone from construction damage
January 11, 2010 - What is the best way to protect Texas Madrone trees (small, 8'-10') from damage during construction of a new home on a site with some single, some grouped Madrones?
view the full question and answer

Planting annuals around young oak in Evanston IL
July 30, 2011 - is it OK to plant annuals (i.e. salvias, impatiens or dusty millers) around the base of a young oak tree (2-3 years old)?
view the full question and answer

Leaves wrinkling on Tecoma stans from San Antonio TX
August 16, 2013 - My two year old esperanza (planted in the ground) froze back last winter, came back from the roots & has been doing well all summer. Recently one branch has leaves that are nice & green but very wrin...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center