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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Wednesday - October 20, 2010

From: Woodbury, TN
Region: Southeast
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Plant identification
Answered by: Nan Hampton


Need to identify multi branched plant, feathery appearance, approx 6' tall stalks, grows in clusters. Tiny whitish/pink flowers at top of stems. Very similar in appearance to milfoil, only these grow on dry land. Ethereal in appearance, I am using it as an ornamental grass foundation planting. Has shallow root system. Is it wild asparagus???????? In middle TN


Mr. Smarty Plants loves to identify plants, but seldom is it possible from a description alone.  Please send us photos and we will do our very best to identify your plant.  Visit Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page to read instructions for submitting photos.  Please follow the instructions carefully and make sure your photos are in good focus.


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