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Tuesday - October 05, 2010

From: LaRue, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Groundcovers
Title: Ground cover for East Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Thank you for your response to (Hamelia), it was very helpful. I recently moved to East Texas and I live in a rural area at altitude 754ft with a sloping landscape with good drainage. My property is mostly wooded but I also have a good deal of sun. I am interested in a native ground cover that is drought tolerant and one that will not get out of control. I have no way to ‘border’ the ground cover so it must grow enough to cover but not take over. Any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Here are some candidates for ground covers that are native to Henderson County or adjacent counties.  There is a mix of shade and sun plants.

Geum canadense (White avens) grows in shade and part shade and is evergreen if watered in the summer.  The Wasowskis in Native Texas Plants:  Landscaping Region by Region say that this plant can be mowed to 4 inches.

Mitchella repens (Partridgeberry) is evergreen and grows in shade and part shade to less than four inches.

Oenothera speciosa (Pink evening primrose) grows in sun and part shade and is almost evergreen, but it may go dormant in summer.

Phyla nodiflora (Texas frogfruit) is almost evergreen but can go dormant in winter.  It grows in sun, part shade and shade.

Polystichum acrostichoides (Christmas fern) is evergreen and grows in the shade to one or two feet.

Salvia lyrata (Lyreleaf sage) is evergreen and grows in sun, part shade and shade to one to two feet, but can be mowed to four inches.

Packera obovata (Golden groundsel) is evergreen and grows in shade and part shade.  It grows to two feet but can be mowed to 3 inches.

Glandularia bipinnatifida (Purple prairie verbena) is evergreen and grows to 10 inches in sun, part shade, and shade.


Geum canadense


Mitchella repens


Oenothera speciosa


Phyla nodiflora


Polystichum acrostichoides


Salvia lyrata


Packera obovata


Glandularia bipinnatifida

 

 

 

 

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