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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Wednesday - October 06, 2010

From: Oviedo, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives, Shrubs
Title: Why won't my Jacaranda flower in Oviedo, FL?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I have a Jacaranda tree that is 12 years old and and nearly 30 feet tall. It is a beautiful healthy tree that has never produced flowers. How can I get my tree to bloom? Thank you

ANSWER:

Jacaranda makes a handsome tree, but when it flowers it is spectacular. I can understand your frustration, because 12 years is a long time to wait. However, Jacaranda mimosifolia is a non-native plant from Brazil and Argentina and thus falls outside our area of focus at the Lady Bird Wildflower Center which is  to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes.

I'm including some links that deal with the growth and care of Jacaranda plants. One thing to consider is whether it is in the right place to flower? Does it get enough sun? Does it have sandy, well-drained soil? It is hardy in USDA zones 9-11, and Oviedo is in zone 10, so that shouldn't be part of the problem.  In some plants, flowering is inhibited if the nitrogen/phosphorus ratio is too high. This can occur when the plants receive the same type of high nitrogen fertilizer that is being placed on the lawn. This link from Growing Advisor can give you some help with this.

Look at these links from eHow and searchwarp and see how your growing conditions compare. You might want to contact the folks at the Seminole County office of University of Florida Extension for help closer to home.

 

 

 

 

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