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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - September 23, 2010

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Plant identification
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

There is a vine that grows at my child's daycare that has been taunting me day and night, because I have no idea what it is and I typically have no problems identifying plants. Description: Vine- Looks like it belongs in the Solanaceae Family because the flowers are much like that of a tomato, light yellow, the leafs are an oaky shape, it's in partial shade, and the fruit is a little smaller than a golf ball, orange/red, smooth skin, almost round shape, and the fruit has been sitting on the vine for a while, and continues to into the Fall.

ANSWER:

Your vine sounds to me like Ibervillea lindheimeri (Lindheimer's globeberry).  Please see the photos below.  If this isn't your vine, please take photos and send them to us.  We will do our very best to identify it.  Visit Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page to read instructions for submitting photos.  Please follow the instructions carefullly and make sure that your photos are in good focus.


Ibervillea lindheimeri

Ibervillea lindheimeri

Ibervillea lindheimeri

Ibervillea lindheimeri

 

 

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