En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - September 28, 2010

From: Lawton, OK
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants
Title: Native plants threatened by invasives in Oklahoma?
Answered by: Marilyn Kircus

QUESTION:

What are some native plants in Oklahoma that are being threatened by invasive species?

ANSWER:

We don't know.  All of them could eventually be at risk. We do know that invasives  have contributed to the decline of 46% of the imperiled or endangered species in the U.S. And natives are also being displaced by agriculture, urban development, overgrazing, introduced insects and global warming so this is only one part of the bleak picture.

But you can research both the endangered plants of Oklahoma and the invasive plants of Oklahoma and see what invasives are harming at least the threatened or endangered plants. People usually don't study plants that still seem to be present in abundant numbers. This article by the Nature Conservancy can get you started on the worst three Oklahoma invaders. And notice that eastern red cedar is both a native and an invasive. Human management has allowed it to become invasive.

Here is more information on invasives. Use the fact sheets to find out more about each invasive plant.

And here is a list of the known Oklahoma plants that are at risk of extinction.

Here is the watch list of invasives and possible invasives for Oklahoma.

Hope this will get you started on answering your question.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Invasive Plants Questions

Plant identification of tall stalk with many thorns
April 17, 2009 - Dear Mr. Smarty Pants: After we raked all the leaves, I found three or four plants on my property that are thin tall stalks with many thorns. Leaves are just growing, so I cannot describe them. ...
view the full question and answer

Native plants for shade in Ennis TX
August 26, 2011 - My house faces south. The southwest side of the front yard has a Pride of Houston, Japanese Barberry, 2 crape myrtles and some dwarf yaupon hollies. The other section, divided by a stairway to the p...
view the full question and answer

Non-branching mimosa tree
June 26, 2008 - I have a Mimosa Tree, just about 2 years old, grown from seed. The problem with it is that it has not branched out, it looks like one long branch growing out of the ground, about 5 feet if stood strai...
view the full question and answer

More on oak problems in Carrollton TX
April 04, 2011 - Thank you for answering me, I will contact a specialist to see if we can determine the cause. but since writing you we have pulled down a small twig to see the leaf more closely, it is more of a reddi...
view the full question and answer

Asian Jasmine in Austin
November 29, 2010 - I just sent you a question about eliminating jasmine and forgot to mention it is Asian jasmine.
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center