En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - September 13, 2010

From: Archdale, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Planting non-native peach seed from Archdale NC
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Planting and watering peach seeds. Can you give advice for my 12 year old who has recently planted some peach seeds in our yard in Archdale NC? Is the fall okay for planting? Watering instructions? I know this isn't under the wildflower category, but any help is appreciated.

ANSWER:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is not limited exclusively to wildflowers; what it IS limited to is plants native not only to North America but to the area in which the plants are being grown.  Prunus persica, peach, is native to China, and therefore out of our realm of expertise. There are a number of members of the Prunus species that are native to North America, mostly wild plums. The "persica" in the botanical name of the plant refers to the fact that in early times, it was thought that the peach had originated in Persia; however, it actually was first grown in China, and probably passed on to the Middle East on the Silk Road before Christian times. 

We always like to encourage young gardeners, so we have this article from Colorado State University Extension, Denver County Office, Starting peaches from pits that we hope will help your son with his project. Most peaches such as you would purchase in the produce aisle are propagated by budding onto specific rootstock, which means if the seeds you have do sprout, bloom and fruit, the peaches may not look anything like the peaches from which the pit was taken. 

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Non-native pomegranate failing to fruit from Highland Village TX
October 20, 2012 - Last spring I planted a pomegranate tree (type: Wonderful) which is supposed to produce edible fruit. It had 5 or 6 absolutely beautiful blooms, but each of them dropped off and no sign of fruit. Is...
view the full question and answer

Care for non-native Plumeria from Concord NC
August 01, 2012 - I have had my plumeria plant for the past 5 to 7 years. It is a pot plant and I live in North Carolina, I take the pot inside in he winter time. The leaves fall off, in the spring after the last fro...
view the full question and answer

Need help with Wheeler's Dwarf Pittosporum
September 02, 2015 - We have about five Dwarf Wheeler Pittosporum plants. All of them are mature and were doing well. I was on vacation for a week or so and when I came back I saw of each of them is plant 90% dead. The d...
view the full question and answer

Lily plants being chewed from Austin
June 20, 2013 - Something is chewing my lily plants to the ground. Any ideas what and do I stop them?
view the full question and answer

Acre-scale Grass Removal near Austin, TX
July 04, 2014 - How do I get rid of 10 acres of Kleingrass?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center