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Tuesday - September 07, 2010

From: Glencoe, CA
Region: California
Topic: Trees
Title: Trees to plant around horse corrals
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I would like to know what types of trees would be good to plant around my horse corrals.

ANSWER:

The first priority, I would think, is to plant trees that won't harm your horses if they decide to have a nibble.  Here are several databases that have information about plants toxic to horses and other animals:

ASPCA Toxic and Non-Toxic Plant Lists—Horses

Poisonous Plants of North Carolina

Cornell University Plants Poisonous to Livestock

Toxic Plants of Texas 

University of Pennsylvania Poisonous Plants

Canadian Poisonous Plants Information System

Here are some trees that are native to your area of California that do NOT appear on any of the toxic plant databases.  Since I don't know exactly what the growing conditions of your site are, I would urge you to read the GROWING CONDITIONS for each plant on the species page to be sure that they are compatible with your site.

Alnus rhombifolia (White alder) and here are photos and more information.

Fraxinus dipetala (California ash) and here are photos and more information.

Pinus sabiniana (California foothill pine) and here are photos and more information.

Platanus racemosa (California sycamore)

Populus fremontii (Fremont cottonwood)

Here are a couple of pictures from our Image Gallery:


Platanus racemosa

Populus fremontii

 

 

 

 

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