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Sunday - August 22, 2010

From: Cary, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: General Botany
Title: History of hybrid Hibiscus Davis Creek from Cary NC
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Re: Hibiscus Davis Creek. Can you tell me this hybrid's history? H. coccineus H. militaris perhaps?

ANSWER:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is committed to the growth, propagation and protection of plants native to North America and to the area in which they are being grown. This does not include hybrids, as it is difficult or impossible to understand the traits of a plant which may have parentage of many different plants, some native, some non-native. However, we will do a quick online search and see if anyone else knows the answer to your question.

Hibiscus coccineus (scarlet rosemallow), also known as Texas Star Hibiscus, is native to North Carolina and not to Texas. Hibiscus militaris is a synonym for Hibiscus laevis (halberdleaf rosemallow), also native to North Carolina. 

Whether these two species are the parents of the hybrid 'Davis Creek,' we were unable to learn. You might contact the American Hibiscus Society. Pictures from Google.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Hibiscus coccineus

Hibiscus coccineus

Hibiscus laevis

Hibiscus laevis

 

 

 

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