Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - August 07, 2010

From: Los Angeles, CA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Trees
Title: Trees around the inland waterways in Virginia
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am writing a piece about Virginia Beach, Virginia. Could you tell me other than Pine what trees are found in the forests around the inland waterways? Thank-you very much!

ANSWER:

You can find these yourself by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database.  First select 'Virginia' under Select State or Province and then 'Tree' under Habit (general appearance).  This will give you a list of nearly 200 native trees that occur in Virginia.  Some of these 200 may not occur along the inland waterways, however, but it is relatively simple to find out if they do or not.  For instance, let's take the first tree on the list with photos, Acer barbatum (southern sugar maple).  On the species page scroll down to near the bottom of the page to the ADDTIONAL RESOURCES section.  Click on the link (the species name) beside USDA.  This will take you to the USDA Plants Database where there is a distribution map.  On the map click on Virginia and you will see the tree's distribution in Virginia.  As it turn's out, the southern sugar maple is found near Newport News and Norfolk.  If you do the same exercise with Acer spicatum (mountain maple), you will find that it occurs much further west than the southern sugar maple and doesn't occur along the inland waterway.  You can check out all the other listed trees this way, as well.

You might also like to visit the Virginia Department of Conservation & Recreation Natural Heritage page.  Their "Overview of the Physiography and Vegetation of Virginia" should give you an idea of what sorts of trees you find in the various regions of Virginia.  There are other resources listed on the Natural Heritage page that may be useful, too.

 

More Trees Questions

Dying Bigelow oaks in Austin
July 30, 2010 - I have several stands of Bigelow Oak (Q.sinuata var. breviloba) in NW Austin mixed with Yaupon and Cedar Elms. Several have died each year for the past 8 years. Two now have brown, dry leaves which is...
view the full question and answer

Need an inexpensive blooming tree in Venus, TX
May 02, 2015 - I need a non expensive booming tree for our yard.
view the full question and answer

Cedar elm with brown leaves
August 12, 2011 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, We feel we may have limited time to save our beautiful Ceder Elm. We have many trees in our yard (Post Oaks and Cedar Elms) and have been told they are all between 50 - 75 year...
view the full question and answer

Western soapberry dropping leaves in San Antonio
June 03, 2013 - My Western Soapberry tree (China berry?) Suddenly started dropping full, perfectly healthy green, leaf units. Now half the tree is turning yellow. There is a second tree in the yard not far from this ...
view the full question and answer

Registered/patented pecan by Foster W. Fort
August 01, 2010 - Hello, we own a historic house museum once owned by the Fort family of Waco, and have learned that Foster W. Fort developed a type of pecan tree and had an orchard somewhere here around Waco (possibly...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.