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Tuesday - August 03, 2010

From: Canton, PA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Erosion Control
Title: Native plants for erosion control in sun in Canton PA
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We just cleared a bank and need native plants and shrubs to grow for erosion control. Much sun. Thank you.

ANSWER:

First of all, grasses with their extensive fibrous root systems are ideal plants to use for erosion control so you would definitely want to plant some grasses on the bank.  Here are a few that are native to your area:

Grasses

Elymus canadensis (Canada wildrye)

Bromus kalmii (arctic brome)

Deschampsia cespitosa (tufted hairgrass)

Eragrostis spectabilis (purple lovegrass)

There are a variety of herbaceous perennials and small shrubs that you can add to the grasses.

Perennials and small shrubs

Actaea rubra (red baneberry)

Lupinus perennis (sundial lupine)

Monarda didyma (scarlet beebalm)

Monarda fistulosa (wild bergamot)

Phlox subulata (moss phlox)

Physostegia virginiana (obedient plant)

Gaylussacia baccata (black huckleberry)

Rosa carolina (Carolina rose)

Here are photos from our Image Galery:


Elymus canadensis

Bromus kalmii

Deschampsia cespitosa

Eragrostis spectabilis

Actaea rubra

Lupinus perennis

Monarda didyma

Monarda fistulosa

Phlox subulata

Physostegia virginiana

Gaylussacia baccata

Rosa carolina

 

 

 

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