Explore Plants

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 

Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - July 05, 2010

From: Lubbock, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Does non-native mimosa tree have a tap root from Lubbock TX?
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Does a mimosa tree have a tap root? I would like to plant one next to a concrete driveway to help shade the garage and do not want to cause damage to the driveway in the future. Thank you in advance for your expertise.

ANSWER:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the areas in which those plants are being grown. Albizia julibrissin, Mimosa or Silk Tree, is native to China and therefore out of our range of expertise. Read this article from the Plant Conservation Alliance's Alien Plant Working Group LEAST WANTED on the Mimosa or Silk Tree to learn why we do not recommend it, regardless of what kind of root it has.

You might also be interested in reading this Dave's Garden Forum page on Albizia julibrissin, especially the MANY negative comments. 

There are few trees with a true taproot; they may begin with one, but as time goes by roots will spread from that center root, both in search of water and nutrients and also as a base to stabilize the tree in the ground. From this USDA Forest Service site Mimosa, we extracted these two sentences apropos of your question:

"Breakage: susceptible to breakage either at the crotch due to poor collar formation, or the wood itself is weak and tends to break."

"Roots: surface roots can lift sidewalks or interfere with mowing."

Honestly, most trees will interfere with foundations, sidewalks or driveways if planted too close, regardless of the type of root. Do your research on trees native to your area by going to our Recommended Species, clicking on Texas High Plains on the map, and Narrow Your Search to trees, and indicate the amount of light needed, moisture, etc.  You can follow the plant links to the page on each tree to learn the projected size of that tree. Generally speaking, a tree root system can be from 2 to 4 times the size of the crown of the tree, so consider that when you decide where to plant a tree. 

 

 

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Black Sooty Mold on Bay Tree
February 25, 2013 - I have a large bay tree and all the leaves are covered with a black mold-like substance on the top part of the leaf. Under each leaf are some black/brown spots. I have washed the leaves with soap and ...
view the full question and answer

Evergreen hedge for constant rain
June 24, 2008 - We live in Washington State up north by Canadian border. We need a hedge that will survive the constant rain. We have tried cedar. They seem to turn brown and die,one at a time so we keep replacing th...
view the full question and answer

Growing non-native daylilies from Albuquerque
May 05, 2013 - Need some tips on planting daylilies in the Northeast heights of Albuquerque. I've amended clay soil with cottonbur mulch/compost mix and added gypsum. Can I do anything else to ensure growing succes...
view the full question and answer

Growth of non-native bermudagrass in Snelville GA
July 16, 2011 - How do you grow Bermuda grass successfully in the state of Georgia? Techniques in fertilization, lawn cutting and general maintenance. Thank you.
view the full question and answer

Failure to bloom of tropical plumeria
July 04, 2008 - I have had my plumeria for the past five years. The first three years it bloomed but has not the past two. The plant is healthy and continues to grow but will not flower. It seems to be very health...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.