En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - June 23, 2010

From: Round Mountain, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification, Trees
Title: Is the Ashe juniper native from Round Mountain TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Some friends and I disagree on something, and I hope you will settle the argument. Are the cedars found in the Texas hill country (ashe juniper) native or not?

ANSWER:

They are native to North America, native to Texas and native to Blanco County. What they are NOT are cedars. They are Juniperus ashei (Ashe's juniper). The members of the Cedrus (cedar) genus are members of the Pinaceae family, and we did not find any native to North America. Ashe's Juniper, also referred to as Mountain Cedar, belongs to the Cypressaceae family.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Juniperus ashei

Juniperus ashei

Juniperus ashei

Juniperus ashei

 

 

 

More Plant Identification Questions

Wild native trees with orange blooms
March 30, 2012 - What is the wild native tree that is blooming orange blooms - as you drive down the road thru Chappel Hill, and Brenham area. I've never seen these before when we went viewing bluebonnets - however,...
view the full question and answer

Tree purchased at LBJWC plant sale from Austin
November 10, 2009 - I bought a tree at the 2008 LBJ Wildflower plant sale, it is growing great. I would like to plant it in the proper location/soil but lost the name tag and can't identify it. It has very fine leaves...
view the full question and answer

Photo identification from Sun Tan Valley AZ
June 29, 2013 - I just tried sending y'all some photos of a plant I'd like to identify. The email address failed. Please let me know how I can get these 3 photos sent.
view the full question and answer

Plant identification
June 10, 2008 - Mr. Smarty Plants, My neighbor gave me a plant that is about 3 foot tall, has a main stalk, and leaves that produce small “baby” plants at the edge of the leaves. These plants grow roots and once dev...
view the full question and answer

Plant ID in Flower Mound TX
June 23, 2009 - I have a large native tree in the back yard, leaves resembles a live oak, but evergreen,& small white flowers in the spring, very tall vase shaped tree. It had no acorns or berries.
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | JOBS | SITEMAP | STAFF INTRANET
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center