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Monday - June 21, 2010

From: Four Lakes, WA
Region: Northwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Diseases and Disorders
Title: Problems in non- native weeping willow in Spokane WA
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

My wife and I have a weeping willow tree that has done well for two years. This year some of the branches are loosing their leaves in late spring in Spokane, WA. I though it was from the wind but has spread to other branches. The leaves seem to dry out and blow off in the wind but it is non-consecutive to neighboring branches. I was curious as to prune off the bad looking limbs to the nearest green leaf or see if it rejuvenates. Thank you for any information

ANSWER:

Thank you for your question. While we would like to answer all questions we receive, Mr. Smarty Plants' expertise is limited to plant species native to North America, their habitats and cultivation. Limited resources require us to decline answering questions that delve into other areas. We hope you understand.

Non-native to the United States, Salix x sepulcralis is a hybrid of a Chinese species (Peking willow) and a European species (white willow), and is said to grow in Zones 5 to 8 in the United States. It is weak-wooded, fast-growing and, therefore, short-lived. It has aggressive roots, can lift sidewalks and interfere with sewer lines, often growing on soil surface, making a problem with mowing. It is susceptible to a number of pests and diseases, and notorious for littering the ground beneath it. You might check out this University of Florida Extension website on Weeping Willows for more information as well as this Q&A from North Dakota State University Extension on weeping willows.The UBC Botanical Garden Forum is also a good source of information on non-native plants. 

 

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