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Wednesday - May 26, 2010

From: Plano, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Privacy Screening
Title: Evergreen tree for privacy screen in Collin County, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am looking for a shrub or tree that will serve as a privacy screen. I would like it to grow very tall and be thick to help provide some privacy. I live in Collin County, and the area where the tree/shrubs will be placed gets a lot of morning sun, and is part shade in the afternoon. Currently it is located in an area that has collects rain water that will stay for several hours after a big rain. Ideally, I would love to find a tree/shrub that grows fast and can grow into an effective privacy screen fairly quickly.

ANSWER:

I am supposing you want something evergreen since you are looking for a privacy screen.  I can find several evergreen trees that are native to Collin County but I'm not sure how tall "very tall" is and, more importantly there aren't too many trees that like to be in wet areas.  You should try to figure out why the area collects water after a rain and see if you can remedy it so that the drainage is better.  I'm not sure how big the area is but perhaps you should consider a French drain to eliminate the excess water that stands in the area.  Here are several trees and shrubs that are evergreen and are native to Collin County.  Either the wax myrtle, yaupon or laurelcherry sound like the best bet for you unless you figure out a way to remedy your drainage problem.

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle) grows 6 to 12 feet tall and likes moist or wet soils.

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon) usually grows 12 to 25 feet, but can grow higher.  It will grow in dry or moist soils and tolerates poor drainage.

Prunus caroliniana (Carolina laurelcherry) grows 15 to 36 feet in moist soil.  Here are more photos.

Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar) usually grows to 30 to 40 feet and can be trimmed into a hedge.  It, however, prefers dry soils.

Quercus fusiformis (plateau oak) grows to 20 to 40 feet, but prefers dry soils.

Here are photos from our Image Gallery:

 

 

 

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