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Mr. Smarty Plants - Freeze problems with non-native weeping willow in Joplin, MO

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Thursday - May 13, 2010

From: Joplin, MO
Region: Midwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Freeze problems with non-native weeping willow in Joplin, MO
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

My weeping willow had leaves forming and a frost hit and now the tree looks like it is dead. Everything else is in bloom and I don't know if the frost killed my tree or if I need to wait to see if it will form new leaves again. What should I do? It's been approx 5 or 6 weeks since the frost. Thank you for your help.

ANSWER:

Thank you for your question. While we would like to answer all questions we receive, Mr. Smarty Plants' expertise is limited to plant species native to North America, their habitats and cultivation. Limited resources require us to decline answering questions that delve into other areas. We hope you understand.

Non-native to the United States, Salix x sepulcralis is a hybrid of a Chinese species (Peking willow) and a European species (white willow), and is said to grow in Zones 5 to 8 in the United States. It is weak-wooded, fast-growing and, therefore, short-lived. It has aggressive roots, can lift sidewalks and interfere with sewer lines, often growing on soil surface, making a problem with mowing. It is susceptible to a number of pests and diseases, and notorious for littering the ground beneath it. You might check out this University of Florida Extension website on Weeping Willows for more information as well as this Q&A from North Dakota State University Extension on weeping willows.The UBC Botanical Garden Forum is also a good source of information on non-native plants. 

 

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