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Tuesday - May 18, 2010

From: El Paso, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shade Tolerant
Title: Shade tree for El Paso, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

hi there, I am looking to plant a shade tree in front of my house, about 10ft away from my house and about 6ft away from the sidewalk. I live in El Paso TX and I am afraid that the tree roots will interfere with the water pipes which are about 6ft away from where I want to plant the tree. Which shade trees would you recommend?

ANSWER:

You can visit our Texas-West Recommended page and use the NARROW YOUR SEARCH option to select 'Tree' from the GENERAL APPEARANCE area.  This will give you a list of trees native to your area that are suitable for landscaping and are commercially available. 

Arbutus xalapensis (Texas madrone) has a tap root and is not likely to cause problems with water line.

Chilopsis linearis (desert willow)  There is no indication that this tree has roots that will cause problems.

Cupressus arizonica (Arizona cypress) Surface roots are not usually a problem.  Here is more information.

Juglans microcarpa (little walnut)  There is no indication that this tree has roots that will cause problems.

Prosopis glandulosa (honey mesquite)  Surface roots are not usually a problem.  Here is more information.

Quercus emoryi (Emory oak)  There is no indication that this tree has roots that will cause problems.

Quercus muehlenbergii (chinkapin oak)  Surface roots not usually a problem.  Here is more information.

Quercus grisea (gray oak)  There is no indication that this tree has roots that will cause problems.

You can check out other trees on the Texas-West Recommended page.

Here are photos from our Image Gallery:


Arbutus xalapensis

Chilopsis linearis

Cupressus arizonica

Juglans microcarpa

Prosopis glandulosa

Quercus emoryi

Quercus muehlenbergii

Quercus grisea

 


 

 

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