En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - May 12, 2010

From: Branchburg, NJ
Region: Northeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: A non-native Japanese Maple for Branchburg NJ
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I am landscaping around my house and am looking for a tree that wont eventually grow too large. I thought maybe a bloodgood Japanese maple. Any suggestions would help

ANSWER:

Acer palmatum, Japanese maple, is non-native to North America, and therefore does not appear in our Native Plant Database. However, here is an article from Paghat's Garden on Acer palmatum 'Bloodgood,' that has some information you can use.

Since we would prefer you plant trees native not only to North America but to the area in Somerset County in central New Jersey, we will look in our database for trees suitable to USDA Hardiness Zone 6b that will not grow too large.

Small Trees Native to  Somerset County, NJ:

Amelanchier canadensis (Canadian serviceberry) - 4 to 20 ft. tall, blooms white April and May, sun, part shade or shade

Betula populifolia (gray birch) - 35 to 50 ft., sun, part shade or shade

Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud) - 15 to 30 ft., part shade or shade

Ilex opaca (American holly) - 25 ft., evergreen, sun, part shade or shade

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Amelanchier canadensis

Betula populifolia

Cercis canadensis

Ilex opaca

 

 

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Non-native Podocarpus macrophyllus in Ft Worth TX
November 12, 2011 - I know this question does not pertain to a native plant but I've spent too much time not finding an answer to my question. I have many mature Podocarpus macrophyllus bushes at my house I purchased in...
view the full question and answer

Non-native invasive chickweed in Collegeville PA
December 31, 2011 - My problem is chickweed. I have found considerable information on how to eliminate the chickweed. My question is after following a suggested elimination process: How and when do I reseed with grass?...
view the full question and answer

Root ball disintegrating on Arroyo sweetwood from Dripping Springs TX
May 11, 2013 - I just purchased a arroyo sweetwood in a 5 gallon container and when I went to put it in the ground the root ball completely fell apart. I put it in the ground and watered it really good. What are its...
view the full question and answer

Best for Austin-non-native loquat or kumquat?
May 04, 2010 - I was wondering which tree is suited better in the Austin,TX, area, the Loquat or the Kumquat, do they lose their leaves in the winter and do they bear fruits?
view the full question and answer

Care of non-native house plant, Pachira aquatica
October 14, 2007 - Mr. Smarty Plants, I have just bought a miniature money tree. I would like to plant it on a metal like decorative pot. What advice would you give me how to prevent the plant from getting any metal re...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center