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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Sunday - May 16, 2010

From: College Station, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Vines
Title: Identification of heartleaf vine
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Howdy! I had a plant that I would like to replace but I don't know what it is, I was hoping you could help. It was a climbing vine with large (>6") heart-shaped leaves. The underside of the leaves were fuzzy and there were no flowers. I'm pretty sure it was a perennial. It was in full sun and was very fast growing and got to over 5 feet. Thanks so much!!

ANSWER:

There is a good chance that your vine is not native to North America and North American native plants are what we are all about here at the Wildflower Center.  If it is a North American native, you might be able to find it in our Native Plant Database by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH and choosing Texas from the Select State or Province box and then selecting 'Vine' fron the Habit (general appearce) area.

Here are some candidates from the list:

Ampelopsis cordata (heartleaf peppervine) and here is more information.

Aristolochia tomentosa (woolly dutchman's pipe)

Matelea reticulata (netted milkvine)

Matelea edwardsensis (plateau milkvine)

Matelea gonocarpos (angularfruit milkvine)

Mikania scandens (climbing hempvine)

Polygonum scandens (climbing false buckwheat)

Vitis cinerea var. helleri (Heller's grape)

If it is not a native vine, then I'm afraid we can't be of much help to find it.


Ampelopsis cordata

Aristolochia tomentosa

Matelea reticulata

Matelea edwardsensis

Matelea gonocarpos

Mikania scandens

Polygonum scandens

Vitis cinerea var. helleri

 

 

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