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Sunday - May 02, 2010

From: Pittsburgh, PA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Trees
Title: June bug larvae destroying Red Twig Dogwood in Pittsburgh, PA
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

June Bug larvae are destroying my Red Twig Dogwood. I have treated with Milky Spore, but the long wait for benefit is too long to save the ailing plant. What can I do? HELP! Thank you from the bottom of those poor roots,

ANSWER:

According to this USDA Plant Profile, Cornus sericea (redosier dogwood) is native in and around Allegheny Co. PA, so it's where it belongs, but it does seem to have a lot of pest and disease problems. In addition to the June bug larvae you were asking about, it also is susceptible to twig blight, scale and bagworms. We found a couple of Internet sites that have more information about this slug and beetle, with suggestions for control: June Bugs Lead to Lawn Grubs  from North Carolina State Extension Service and How To Get Rid of June Bugs from HowToGetRidofStuff.com.

Since we are neither entomologists nor plant pathologists, we would suggest you contact the Pennsylvania State Cooperate Extension Office for Allegheny County for more close-to-home help. You can bet if you are having that much trouble, others in your area are, too.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Cornus sericea

Cornus sericea

Cornus sericea

Cornus sericea

 

 

 

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