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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Friday - May 07, 2010

From: Bellingham, WA
Region: Northwest
Topic: Wildlife Gardens
Title: Plants for a mixed hedgerow for privacy and for the birds
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What are the best native plants for a mixed hedgerow in a small backyard? I want privacy (heights 5'-10') and bird friendly. Thank you for your information.

ANSWER:

You can visit the Washington Recommended native plant list for commercially available landscaping plants for your area.  Use the NARROW YOUR SEARCH option to select 'Shrub' from the General Appearance box.  You can also enter other preferences for Light Requirement, Soil Moisture, etc.

Here are a few suggestions from the list for your mixed hedge row:

Cornus sericea (redosier dogwood)

Gaultheria shallon (salal)

Mahonia aquifolium (hollyleaved barberry)

Morella californica (California wax myrtle) and here are photos and more information.

Rhus glabra (smooth sumac)

Rubus spectabilis (salmonberry)

Sambucus nigra ssp. caerulea (blue elder)

Viburnum edule (squashberry)

Here are photos from our Image Gallery:


Cornus sericea

Gaultheria shallon

Mahonia aquifolium

Rhus glabra

Rubus spectabilis

Sambucus nigra ssp. caerulea

Viburnum edule

 

 

 

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